What is TEDx?

Posted: 26th March 2015 by Danielle in Journal
Comments Off

First a little background on the TEDx event this Saturday and why Taylor wanted to do it.  Then I’ll provide some background on the TED events/speeches in general!

Taylor has always been passionate about TED talks – almost daily he pours a cup of coffee and listens to a TED talk while getting ready. If he has any spare time during the day or at the end of the day he is watching a TED talk on whatever topic he A.)hasn’t listened to, or B.) will further or evolve a thought he had throughout the day (lately with his school work load, spare time is a joke).  Taylor loves to learn, loves to challenge the status quo, and has a extremely unbiased,levelheaded approach that allows him to explore numerous angles and thought-processes.  So to be actually speaking at a TED event is a pretty cool thing for Taylor!
If you’ve ever wanted to hear Taylor talk – or see him live (well sort of)- now is the time.
DETAILS FOR THE EVENT:
DAY AND TIME: Saturday from 7-10PM (with a short intermission)
WHEN: Taylor will be the LAST SPEECH approx. 9:45 pm
HOW TO WATCH:
  • Local people can go to 1 of 3 places if you register at this link.
    • UNI John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center
      Business and Community Services, Room 30, UNI campus
      Register

      Cedar Falls Community Center
      528 Main Street, Cedar Falls
      Register

      The UNI Center for Urban Education (UNI-CUE)
      800 Sycamore St, Waterloo
      Register

  • To listen to him LIVE AT HOME – follow this link:

 

TED Talks are:

The Science Behind TED’s 18-Minute Rule

Ideas are the currency of the 21st century. You can have brilliant ideas—truly revolutionary ideas—but if you cannot persuade others to act, those ideas don’t matter. Today, thanks to the world-famous TED conference, independently organized TEDx events, and new research into the science of persuasion, we’ve learned more about what moves people than we’ve ever known. Given the fact that TED talks are streamed more than 2 million times per day, I would argue that, like it or not, your next presentation is being compared to TED. TED talks are inspiring, educational, informative, and wildly addictive. The length of a TED talk—18 minutes—is one of the key reasons behind the format’s success.

It doesn’t take a scientist to know that you cannot inspire people if you put them to sleep. But scientists are beginning to identify how long most people can pay attention before they tune out. The range seems to be in the area of 10 to 18 minutes. TED organizers reached the conclusion that 18 minutes works best. Nobody, no matter how famous, wealthy, or influential is allowed to speak more than 18 minutes on a TED stage—it doesn’t matter if your name is Bill Gates, Sheryl Sandberg, Bono, or Tony Robbins, who joked that he found the 18-minute rule extra challenging because his shortest seminar was 50 hours!

TED curator Chris Anderson explained the organization’s thinking this way:

It [18 minutes] is long enough to be serious and short enough to hold people’s attention. It turns out that this length also works incredibly well online. It’s the length of a coffee break. So, you watch a great talk, and forward the link to two or three people. It can go viral, very easily. The 18-minute length also works much like the way Twitter forces people to be disciplined in what they write. By forcing speakers who are used to going on for 45 minutes to bring it down to 18, you get them to really think about what they want to say. What is the key point they want to communicate? It has a clarifying effect. It brings discipline.

The 18-minute rule also works because the brain is an energy hog. The average adult human brain only weighs about three pounds, but it consumes an inordinate amount of glucose, oxygen, and blood flow. As the brain takes in new information and is forced to process it, millions of neurons are firing at once, burning energy and leading to fatigue and exhaustion. Researchers at Texas Christian University are finding that the act of listening can be as equally draining as thinking hard about a subject. Dr. Paul King calls it “cognitive backlog.” Like weights, he says, the more information we are asked to take in, the heavier and heavier it gets. Eventually, we drop it all, failing to remember anything we’ve been told. In King’s own research, he found that graduate students recall more of the information they learn when they go to class three days a week for 50 minutes instead of one day a week for three hours. Although most students say they’d prefer to get the class over with at once, they retain more information when receiving the information in shorter amounts of time.

I can already hear the pushback—How can I possibly be expected to say everything I need to say in 18 minutes? A lot can happen in 18 minutes. John Kennedy inspired a nation to look to the stars in 15 minutes. In a 15-minute TED talk, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg inspired millions of women to “lean in.” Steve Jobs gave one of the most popular commencement addresses of our time at Stanford University and he did it in 15 minutes. It took Dr. Martin Luther King a bit longer to share his dream of racial equality—he did it in 17 minutes. If these leaders can inspire their audiences in 18 minutes or less, it’s plenty of time for you to pitch your idea!

Comments

comments

TEDxUNI

Posted: 25th March 2015 by Danielle in Journal
Comments Off

10959694_1420490318243891_2094023751624601937_n

Today’s featured speaker is Taylor Morris!

Taylor served our country as a Navy EOD (Explosive Ordinance Disposal) Technician in Afghanistan. On May 3, 2012, Taylor sustained injuries to all four limbs, entailing loss of both legs above the knee, his left arm from the bicep down, and his right hand. He is the recipient of the Bronze Star with Valor as well as a Purple Heart. After two years of rehabilitation at Walter Reed Medical Center in Washington, D.C, Taylor and his fiancé Danielle live in Cedar Falls, where Taylor is a full-time student at the University of Northern Iowa.

Make sure to see Taylor’s excellent speech this weekend at TEDxUNI!

Taylor has been working extremely hard on this speech for quite some time.  He would explain little tid-bits of the speech here and there but finally just heard the speech in entirety yesterday.  I understand what he has been putting all this extra time and hard work into.  I couldn’t be more proud of his tenacity and drive from idea through the construction stage to the final product.  I cannot wait to see him up on stage to share this speech with others!

10253744_1435838713375718_5404518823423162122_n

 

10442942_1410009469291976_7463005480173610062_n

TEDxUNI will happen live in the Gallagher Bluedorn Performing Arts Center (GBPAC) Great Hall and Lobby from 6 pm – 10 pm March 28, 2015. Lobby Doors open at 6 pm for XFest, a high-energy, one of a kind festival celebrating the TEDx experience. XFest offers participants the opportunity to enjoy refreshments, interact with unique exhibitors, and chat with the TEDx presenters during the action breaks and at the post-program reception.

TEDxUNI Offers Three Ways for You to Participate:

1. Live on-stage viewing in the GBPAC Great Hall (TED limits attendees to 100)Sold Out

PURCHASE TICKETS 

Join a live audience. Seating is on the GBPAC Great Hall Stage with an up-close view of the program and opportunities to converse with presenters.

2. Free Livestream viewing in the GBPAC lobby, the site of XFest 2015 (TED limits attendees to 100)

Join the audience viewing the Livestream on jumbo TVs in the GBPAC lobby. Table seating in the center of XFest 2015. XFest features interactive exhibits, entertainment, food, and community. Meet the presenters at the post-program reception.

Tickets are required and available free of charge for XFest and the Livestream viewing party in the GBPAC lobby. Reserve tickets in person at the Gallagher Bluedorn Box Office or call 319-273-7469.  Tickets must be claimed at the GBPAC ticket window no later than 6:30 pm, March 28.

3. Attend one of these official free viewing parties. Registration includes food, fun, and community:

UNI John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center
Business and Community Services, Room 30, UNI campus
Register

Cedar Falls Community Center
528 Main Street, Cedar Falls
Register

The UNI Center for Urban Education (UNI-CUE)
800 Sycamore St, Waterloo
Register

 

 

 

 

For more information visit: http://tedxuni.com/participate-tedxuni

Comments

comments

LOVE your MELON!

Posted: 24th March 2015 by Danielle in Journal
Comments Off

IMG_8655  IMG_8687 The Love Your Melon Foundation is a 501(c)(3) not for profit organization run by college students on a mission to put a hat on every child battling cancer in America. For every hat sold, another identical hat is given to a child battling cancer. Through funding from this Buy One – Give One program and donations, the Love Your Melon Foundation provides therapeutic entertainment and comfy hats to children battling cancer during the difficult cancer treatment process. The Love Your Melon Foundation creates smiles on the faces of children battling cancer, engages communities to make a difference and provides therapeutic treatment when it is most needed.

Taylor and myself feel privileged to say we are proud supporters of the “Love Your Melon” campaign! You have to protect your own when they are too tired, weak, or down on their luck to fight for themselves

IMG_8690

IMG_8656

Comments

comments